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Sanno
The area name, Sanno, came from having Sanno Shrine in the area. A description of Sanno Shrine appeared in the 1646 Shoho Gocho (Shoho Tax Register).
Sanno was merged into Nonoichi Town in 1955. ...
 
Kusaka Hiyoshi Shrine
The shrine is thought to have been built in the late 15th century. It was called Hiyoshi Shrine in the Edo Period (1603-1868), and renamed as Kusaka Hiyoshi Shrine in 1875. It has been known as the ho...
 
Small Wooden Shrine
The small wooden shrine has a 1.25m-wide roof, 0.76m-wide main body, and stands 0.8m high with a lacquered pedestal. This precious small shrine was built at the end of the Edo Period (1603-1868). It w...
 
Stone Statue of Sanno Gongen God
The small wooden shrine has a 1.25m-wide roof, 0.76m-wide main body, and stands 0.8m high with a lacquered pedestal. This precious small shrine was built at the end of the Edo Period (1603-1868). It w...
 
Sanno Aramiya Sites
The Sanno Toheidagoshi Sites are from settlements dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. Homes with posts dug into the ground, and tateana pit-type sites were found. Many ceramics and Haji Ware such...
 
Sanno Toheidagoshi Sites
The Sanno Toheidagoshi Sites are from settlements dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. Homes with posts dug into the ground, and tateana pit-type sites were found. Many ceramics and Haji Ware such...
 
Sanno Nishiyosa Sites
The Sanno Toheidagoshi Sites are from settlements dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. Homes with posts dug into the ground, and tateana pit-type sites were found. Many ceramics and Haji Ware such...
 
Toheida
The area name, Toheida, first appeared in Tenbun Nikki, or diary of Shonyo, the 10th chief priest of Shinshu Sect Honganji Temple. The diary explains that Jonen Toheida, an influential leader during t...
 
Kiyokane
The name of Kiyokane Village appeared in a letter to a vassal written by the feudal lord Toshiie Maeda in 1599.
This area was known for its watermelon production in the Showa Period (1926-1989)....
 
Fujihira
Fujihira Village was built in the Early Modern Period. There are records showing 5 farmers in 1670, 9 households and 48 residents in 1876. Fujihira became a part of Nonoichi Town in 1955.
Kinkyo...
 
Toheida Shimmura Muragoin
This is the Toheida Shimmura Muragoin (the New Toheida Village Land Tax Notification) issued in 1670. It lists the details of taxation. It lists 234 koku (kusadaka: total rice production), and a 55% m...
 
Former Site of Tomioku Elementary School
Tomioku Elementary School opened in 1902. In 1910, a higher elementary school was added. After the Pacific War, it was separated into Tomioku Elementary School and Junior High School in accordance wit...
 
Mushiokuri in Tomioku Area
The torch procession to drive away crop-eating insects in Tomioku Area is held on a Saturday immediately before July 20 each year. In the evening, 14 town associations in the area depart from the shri...
 
Tomioku Jonkara
The lyrics of the Tomioku jonkara dance have not changed, but the current dance is an integration of the Awada and Kambayashi styles from around 1935. It expresses the movements of weeding and harvest...
 
Isson Isshin Hi
In the midst of an economic recession due to the Showa financial crisis, the Japanese government designated Tomioku village a "financial rehabilitation village" in 1932. Under the slogan, "Village Res...
 
Nakabayashi
The area name, Nakabayashi, appeared in historical documents from the 14th century.
The Hayashi Clan, ruler of the entire area, led a group of samurai. The clan was brought to ruin, however, for...
 
Shishimai (Lion Dance) in Nakabayashi
The lion dance in Nakabayashi is thought to have been choreographed around 1890. The sword-dance section was taught by Seitaro Nishimura, who had a swordsmanship school in the area. Seitaro was born i...
 
Suematsu
The village name, Suematsu, appeared in the 1646 Shoho Gocho (Shoho Tax Register).
There are records in another historical document showing 24 farmers in 1670, and 194 farmers in 1876. Suematsu ...
 
Suematsu Mura Muragoin
This is the Suematsu Mura Muragoin (the Suematsu Village Land Tax Notification) issued in 1670. It lists the details of taxation. It lists 828 koku (kusadaka: total rice production), and a 56% men, or...
 
Kogen Family Documents
Among documents related to the Kogen Family, 414 items remained. They record taxes and descriptions of farmland from the Edo (1603-1868) to modern period. They are important materials that provide inf...
 
Suematsu Burial Mound
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level)...
 
Former Site of Hofukuji Temple
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level)...
 
Former Site of Odachi Yakata
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level)...
 
Former Site of Kogendo Yakata
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level)...
 
Former Site of Suematsu Shinano Yakata
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level)...
 
Suematsu Temple Sites
These sites are from the Suematsu Temple that was built in the late 7th century. It was known from Edo Period (1603-1868). In 1937, an excavation led by local resident Seiko Takamura discovered that t...
 
Wado-kaichin Silver Coin
In 1961, local resident Seiko Takamura found a silver Wado-kaichin coin in an irrigation canal on the west side of the Main Hall at the Suematsu Temple Sites. This historically important artifact led ...
 
Todoroki
Todoroki was located in the area now known as Suematsu 2-chome. A story told in the area is that foxes and raccoons used to cheat people at nighttime.
Long ago, Hachiman Shrine was located in th...
 
Kambayashi
In the Middle Ages, it is thought that Kambayashi was included in the area called Hayashi Go. Hayashi Go is the area where the powerful lord of the Hayashi Clan established his base in the late 12th c...
 
Kambayashi Mura Muragoin
This is the 1670 Kambayashi Mura Muragoin (Kambayashi Village Land Tax Notification). It lists the details of taxation. It lists 794 koku (kusadaka: total rice production), and a 60% men, or tax rate....
 
Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine
Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine is thought to have been established in 1013. People in the area put great faith in it as the main shrine of Hayashi Go; and the head of the Hayashi clan and Genyu Okuwa (jito...
 
A Large Chinquapin Tree in Kambayashi
This large chinquapin tree has been worshipped at Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine since ancient times. According to a 1988 survey, this tree is the second largest in Japan.
There is also a legend asso...
 
Former Site of the Hayashi Clan Residence in Kambayashi
The former site of a Hayashi Clan residence is thought to have been located in Kambayashi. A small shrine currently marks the spot. It is said that there were some area names related to horses and the...
 
Kambayashi Shinjo Sites
Excavations conducted at the Kambayashi Shinjo Sites between 1990 and 1995 covered a total area of 40,750m2. Settlements that existed from the beginning of the 7th century to the end of the 9th centur...
 
Kambayashi Burial Mound
Kambayashi burial mound was found at the west end of Kambayashi Shinjo Sites in 1991. While the grave mounds and internal structures had been destroyed, the lower masonry in the horizontal stone chamb...
 
Kamishinjo Nishiura Sites
The Kamishinjo Nishiura Sites are located to the south of the Shinjo 2-chome junction. Excavation in 1989 uncovered settlements dating from the late 3rd and 9th centuries. In the settlements dating fr...
 
Former site of the Hayashi Clan Residence in Kamishinjo
Until the middle of the 19th century, clay walls remained. It has been said that if someone digs into a stone mound made in the Stone Age, a violent rainstorm will arise.
 
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of the Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. This area was called Togashi Shinjo at that time. The current area ...
 
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. The current area name, Shinjo, is thought to have come from this old na...
 
Shimoshinjo Tanakada Sites
The Shimoshinjo Tanakada Sites were excavated in 1994. The excavation uncovered three tateana (pit-type) dwellings and four homes with posts dug into the ground. However, the excavated area was the ou...
 
Shimoshinjo Arachi Sites
The Shimoshinjo Tanakada Sites were excavated in 1994. The excavation uncovered three tateana (pit-type) dwellings and four homes with posts dug into the ground. However, the excavated area was the ou...
 
Awada
The present-day Awada area was separated into Awada Village and Shinbo Village. It is said that flooding in Awada Village forced residents to move to Shinbo Village.
Commerce in Awada Village fl...
 
Shishimai (Lion Dance) in Awada
The lion dance in Awada was restored for the first time in 27 years by volunteers along with the remodeling of Toyoda Hiyoshi Shrine in 1977. There are many performances of swinging swords in the lion...
 
Stone Lanterns at Toyoda Hiyoshi Shrine
A pair of stone lanterns sits in front of Toyoda Hiyoshi Shrine. Letters inscribed on the lanterns show that they were donated by a samurai of the Kaga Domain in 1695. The names of nine other people w...
 
Awada Sites
The Awada Sites date from the late Jomon Period (approx. 3,000 years ago) to the early 18th century. They spread about 600m from north to south, and 500m from east to west. No homes from the Jomon Per...
 
Yahagi
The area name, Yahagi, comes from the fact the many residents were engaged in arrow making. Yahagi in Japanese means to make arrows. In 1486, when the priest Doko climbed down Mt. Hakusan and stayed o...
 
Former Site of the Bando Fujioka Residence
This is the former site of Bando Fujioka's residence. Bando Fujioka was a vassal of Togashi Clan who died in the battle of Tako Castle in 1488. Until the 19th century, clay walls and the trace of moat...