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( Festivals & Dances ) 12 found.
  Title
Mushiokuri in Oshino
With a history in Kaga stretching back to the middle of the Edo Period (1603-1868), the Torch procession takes place in summer each year to drive off insects that damage the rice crop (Mushiokuri). The Oshino torch procession is held each year on J...
Tsukagoshi Festival
This kyozuka (Sutra mound) is also called Tsukagoshiyama mound. There is a small shrine that houses a stone statue of Fudaishi. During the Tsukagoshiyama mound festival held each year on February 15, the door of the small shrine opens. February 15 wa...
Mushiokuri in Okyozuka
Mushiokuri (torch procession to drive away crop-eating insects) in Okyozuka is held on the Saturday before July 21 each year. It was cancelled several times during WWII. The parade of mushiokuri starts from Sanatake Shrine. People walk around the tow...
Okyozuka Jongara (Okyozuka dance)
Okyozuka Jongara is thought to have been performed before the Meiji Period (1868-1912). It is a Bon festival dance unique to the Oshino Area. Each house had a kentai, or red sash worn when dancing. The Jongara stopped during WWII; however, it was pas...
Nonoichi Jonkara (Nonoichi Dance)
Nonoichi Jonkara is a bon festival dance handed down in the Hon-machi area from olden times. It was performed on August 14 and 15 in the past. At present, it is performed during the Nonoichi Jonkara Festival that takes place from the end of July to t...
Shishimai (Lion Dance) in Hon-machi Area
The lion dance in the Hon-machi area is performed as part of a parade throughout the town at the autumn festival held by Nunoichi Shrine in mid-October each year. The lion dance in the Kaga region expresses a conflict between a man called Bofuri (a m...
Portable Shrine Decorated with Vegetables
The portable shrine decorated with vegetables is carried in a parade throughout the Hon-machi area during the autumn festival of Nunoichi Shrine held in the mid-October. As the name implies, this portable shrine is a small shrine decorated with vege...
Go Jonkara (Go dance)
Go jonkara was created in 1947 when people in the village danced at Go Elementary School. Women wore a red sash and a wraparound slip and men wore a kentai, or red sash and head band when dancing. They danced until midnight. Following the separation...
Mushiokuri in Tomioku Area
The torch procession to drive away crop-eating insects in Tomioku Area is held on a Saturday immediately before July 20 each year. In the evening, 14 town associations in the area depart from the shrine in each town. A person carrying a large paper l...
Tomioku Jonkara
The lyrics of the Tomioku jonkara dance have not changed, but the current dance is an integration of the Awada and Kambayashi styles from around 1935. It expresses the movements of weeding and harvesting rice. In the Jonkara dance performed in Kamba...
Shishimai (Lion Dance) in Nakabayashi
The lion dance in Nakabayashi is thought to have been choreographed around 1890. The sword-dance section was taught by Seitaro Nishimura, who had a swordsmanship school in the area. Seitaro was born in Nakabayashi in 1869, and opened his school in Ji...
Shishimai (Lion Dance) in Awada
The lion dance in Awada was restored for the first time in 27 years by volunteers along with the remodeling of Toyoda Hiyoshi Shrine in 1977. There are many performances of swinging swords in the lion dance, including kusarigama (sickle and chain), a...