English | 中文(简体) | 中文(繁體) | 한국어
  • Main
  • Classification
  • Regions

Search - Regions

( Regions ) 32 found.
  Title
Oshinomaruki
Oshinomaruki was a small settlement located in the east section of what is now Oshino 1-chome. It was a junction on the road to Yokoe, Hakusan City. A Komori Jizo (babysitting jizo) in Oshinomaruki occupies a corner of this junction, and a festival ...
Oshino
The name Oshino derives from Oshino-sho, a Kamakura-era (1185-1333) manor. The area included Oshikoshi, the northern Hon-machi section of Nonoichi City, and the Youkaichi, Yokogawa, and Hisayasu sections of Kanazawa City. When the Kaga Ikko-Ikki (up...
Oshikoshi
The name Oshikoshi is first seen in Shoho Gocho, a book of village yields recorded by the Kaga Domain in the mid-17th century. According to Goto Clan documents, katauri (a type of melon) and eggplant were the major products of the region. Hakusan Sh...
Noshiro
Earthenware uncovered in Noshiro that dates back 3000 years ago shows people lived in the area from ancient times. There were two mounds in Noshiro constructed with river stones. These were called Niso-no-tsuka. Although we cannot identify these moun...
Nagaike
The Kaganokuni Ishikawagun Sonshi (History of Villages in Ishikawa County, Kaga Province) describes the origin of Nagaike Village's name. It describes the village as being long from north to south, with more dwellings seen in the south, on land that ...
Okyozuka
The name of the area "Okyozuka" came from the kyozuka (Sutra mound) located to the north of the settlement. The Land Tax Notification submitted in 1670 listed 1,028 koku (kusadaka: total rice production), and 25 farmers, etc. Okyozuka was ...
Taheiji
The place name, Taheiji, is from the temple that Gen-I Fushaku, a senior disciple of Sotetsu Meiho and the 4th chief priest of Daijoji Temple, established in the area. The road running through the area from north to south is called Taheiji Kaido (Ta...
Yahagi
The area name, Yahagi, comes from the fact the many residents were engaged in arrow making. Yahagi in Japanese means to make arrows. In 1486, when the priest Doko climbed down Mt. Hakusan and stayed overnight in Yahagi, he composed a tanka, a Japanes...
Kitayokonomiya
Hakusan Shrine was established in 987 or 988 and protected Kitayokonomiya (present-day Nukashin-machi in Kanazawa City and the northern area of Hon-machi 2-chome in Nonoichi City). The main hall was located in Kitayokonomiya, and the worship hall was...
Former Nonoichi Area
The name Nonoichi first appeared in the Sannomiya Koki, which was written in 1312 and housed at Shirayama Hime Shrine. Governor (shugo) Togashi used this area as a base to control Kaga Province. The reason is because Nonoichi was located at an import...
Inari
The area's name, Inari, is found in the 1491 diary of Court Noble Tamehiro Reizei as Inari Shrine. It has also been noted that abandoned land in this area was cultivated and developed into Inari Village along with farmland reform by the Kaga Domian t...
Mikkaichi
The name, Mikkaichi (Market on dates that include 3), came from markets held on the 3rd, 13th, and 23rd of each month during the Middle Ages. The market declined in the late 16th century, but it is thought that the farmers living in this area later f...
Futsukaichi
The name, Futsukaichi (Market on dates with the number 2 in them), came from a market held on the 2nd, 12th, and 22nd of each month around the 14th century. It was located near Yokoe-no-sho, a manor that belonged to Tenryuji Temple in Kyoto, and flou...
Tokumoto
The area name, Tokumoto, came from Tokumoto Tsukada, a samurai who served at Matto Castle and lived in the area. People started growing Makuwauri melons in the area in 1683. They were very tasty and became popular in Kanazawa. In 1956, Tokumoto was ...
Go (Former Shimo-tanaka)
Go Town was formerly named Tanaka Village. The name Tanaka first appeared in a document dated 1622 that was housed at Higashi Honganji Temple. Tanaka Village consisted of two areas, Kami-tanaka and Shimo-tanaka. Makuwauri melons were grown in the Edo...
Yanagi Town
Yanagi Town was Yanagi-machi Village in the Edo Period (1603-1868). "Machi" means segmented field. The area was sectioned off by willow trees. Willow is yanagi in Japanese, and it is thought that the name "yanagi" came from the wi...
Rengeji
The area name, Rengeji, came from the Rengeji Temple that once stood in the area. Rengeji Temple was a Tendai Sect temple in the Middle Ages, and it enshrined Kumano Gongen (God of Kumano). Rengeji Village first appeared in a 1646 Shoho Gocho (Shoho ...
Tanoshiri
The village name, Tanoshiri, appeared in a letter sent by Toshiie Maeda to his vassal Hikozo Fuwa in 1599. Tanoshiri Village was merged into Nonoichi Town in 1956. Go Community Center to the north of Tanoshiri Town was built in 1957. The statue of S...
Horiuchi
The area name, Horiuchi, appeared in the Tenbun Nikki (Tenbun Diary) written by Shonyo, the 10th chief abbot of the Honganji Temple, in the 16th century. Landholders' residences were often surrounded by moats at that time. Horiuchi means "within...
Shimobayashi
Shimobayashi was related to the Hayashi Clan that ruled the area. The name Shimobayashi is found in a historical document written in the 14th century. Shimobayashi became a part of Nonoichi Town in 1955. Yakushi Hiyoshi Shrine, thought to have been...
Kuraigawa
The village name, Kuraigawa, first appeared in the Shoho Gocho (Shoho Tax Register) created by Kaga Domain in 1646. The Kuraigawa Village Land Tax Notification issued in 1670 lists the details of taxation. It lists 135 koku (kusadaka: total rice prod...
Sanno
The area name, Sanno, came from having Sanno Shrine in the area. A description of Sanno Shrine appeared in the 1646 Shoho Gocho (Shoho Tax Register). Sanno was merged into Nonoichi Town in 1955. Kusaka Hiyoshi Shrine protects Sanno.
Toheida
The area name, Toheida, first appeared in Tenbun Nikki, or diary of Shonyo, the 10th chief priest of Shinshu Sect Honganji Temple. The diary explains that Jonen Toheida, an influential leader during the Ikko Ikki (uprising of Ikko Sect followers), li...
Kiyokane
The name of Kiyokane Village appeared in a letter to a vassal written by the feudal lord Toshiie Maeda in 1599. This area was known for its watermelon production in the Showa Period (1926-1989). The legend of the God of Stone has been passed down in...
Fujihira
Fujihira Village was built in the Early Modern Period. There are records showing 5 farmers in 1670, 9 households and 48 residents in 1876. Fujihira became a part of Nonoichi Town in 1955. Kinkyo Hachiman Shrine in this area is thought to have been b...
Nakabayashi
The area name, Nakabayashi, appeared in historical documents from the 14th century. The Hayashi Clan, ruler of the entire area, led a group of samurai. The clan was brought to ruin, however, for its allegiance to Emperor Gotoba, who had been defeate...
Suematsu
The village name, Suematsu, appeared in the 1646 Shoho Gocho (Shoho Tax Register). There are records in another historical document showing 24 farmers in 1670, and 194 farmers in 1876. Suematsu became a part of Tomioku Village in 1889. At the beginn...
Todoroki
Todoroki was located in the area now known as Suematsu 2-chome. A story told in the area is that foxes and raccoons used to cheat people at nighttime. Long ago, Hachiman Shrine was located in the southeast, and Ebisu Shrine was located in the west. ...
Kambayashi
In the Middle Ages, it is thought that Kambayashi was included in the area called Hayashi Go. Hayashi Go is the area where the powerful lord of the Hayashi Clan established his base in the late 12th century. In 1352, Genyu Okuwa, a Jito (medieval la...
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of the Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. This area was called Togashi Shinjo at that time. The current area name, Shinjo, is thought to have come from this ol...
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. The current area name, Shinjo, is thought to have come from this old name. It was merged into Nonoichi Town in 1955. Thi...
Awada
The present-day Awada area was separated into Awada Village and Shinbo Village. It is said that flooding in Awada Village forced residents to move to Shinbo Village. Commerce in Awada Village flourished in the late 19th century because of its good l...